#Twitter Game Strong: The best CBB players to follow

It took (almost) 72 years, but it finally happened. Grant Gibbs exhausted his eligibility at Creighton. With that, Gibbs must give up his unofficial title as “College Basketball’s Best Player Twitter Follow”.

It’s with this thought in mind that we search. We search for the best college basketball players to follow on Twitter. We kept the search strictly to those that play, and kept coaches and administrators out of the quest because, we all know @CoachMiles and @CoachChrisMack have the Coach Twitter game on lockdown.

We judged players on three main criteria:

1.) Tweet volume – It’s a subjective phrase. It could be enough that they warrant a follow, but not so many tweets that they’re just simply responding to every little RT and subtweet they see. It’s not worth it to get 1-2 entertaining tweets to wade through a swamp of “haha ur crazy bruh!!!!” tweets. You’ve got to find a happy medium.

2.) Entertainment value – Duh. If you want to be the best college basketball player in the Twitter game, you’ve got to be able to get and keep an audience. Equal parts funny, interesting and smart. Though it doesn’t necessarily mean funny is a requirement. If it’s a guy who has thought-provoking or informative tweets, that’s definitely a good place to start.

3.) Personal quality – College dudes are gonna be college dudes. Lord knows I was one once. So it’s cool to have weird stuff going on in their feed. But as long as that feed is also fun to read, it’s fine. Keep cursing to a minimum, fandom and diversity to the maximum.

So, with the parameters set, we searched. Here’s what we found to be the top follows on the college basketball hardwood (complete with a ton of — probably unnecessary — hashtags).

Georges Niang (@GeorgesNiang20) – He’s a thought-provoking type who #appreciates the fan base he plays for at (RT) #IowaState. He also doesn’t mind crowd-sourcing things for his future, something that could serve the almost-#surefire pro after college. If that doesn’t work out, maybe he has a career as a #motivationaspeaker . He likes to tweet — over 11,200  to his credit — but most are with a positive vibe, so it’s alright.

Fred VanVleet (@FredVanVleet) – VanVleet might be the most #grateful college #hooper on #Twitter. He came out of high school with little #fanfare and since the success of the 2012-13 #WichitaState squad he’s been one of the best point guards in the nation. He doesn’t take much for granted and lets you know it, but won’t clog up your #feed (less than 5,000 tweets). He’s also cool with passing along the love to others. Also, dude’s a #realist.

Kyle Wiltjer (@kwiltj) – The guy loves to #clown. The former #Kentucky forward and current #Gonzaga transfer loves to roll over his #Instagram game into Twitter, but still uses the good stuff in 140 characters. He also likes to throw in a few #struggletweets. All in a neat package of less than 5,000 tweets.

Dakari Johnson (@SafariDakari44) – The #Kentucky big man loves to #motivate, isn’t afraid to #askaquestion and, damn it, he’s proud to be from #Merica. The probable future #NBADraft pick give you an #insideview into his day and loves a good #movie. He also does it all in less than 7,000 tweets. On a team full of stars, Johnson takes the Twitter prize.

Oh and that Twitter name is awesome.

Sam Dekker (@samdek1) – Dekker, along with being one of the top returning players in the #B1G and a linchpin in the #WisconsinBadgers hopes for a second straight #FinalFour, mixes a blend of bro humor, sports savvy and general opinion . A true pioneer in the #TwitterCBB game with #HotSportTakes, #diverse #sports interests and all that. It’s just a shame he doesn’t tweet more, with only 325 to date.

Did I miss anyone? Let me know on Twitter at @David_Harten or at tbbchronicles@gmail.com.


Who are the most underrated national champs of all-time?

Everyone remembers the champs. From the first NCAA champions in Oregon in 1939 to last year’s UConn team, hoopheads can tell you who won.

Problem is, some are more remembered than others in history. The 1951 Kentucky squad coined the Fabulous Five.  The UCLA teams of the early 1970s were arguably the most dominant of their era. Right after, the 1976 Indiana team still remains the last undefeated champion in Division I college basketball.

In between the ones that are always brought up, there are the champs that don’t come to mind. At least not at first, anyway.

So who are they? TBBC looks into who are the most underrated champions all-time and why.

1989-90 UNLV

Record – 35-5

Coach – Jerry Tarkanian

What everyone remembers – That four of their starting five would eventually be drafted into the NBA. The team that was hounded by the NCAA arguably more than any program in college basketball history — with reason — had horses with the centerpiece of forward Larry Johnson (in his first season of Division I ball out of Odessa College), veteran point guard Greg Anthony, reliable forward Stacey Augmon, do-it-all utility man George Ackles and sharpshooter Anderson Hunt, who was the Big West Player of the Year as a sophomore, prior to Johnson’s arrival on campus.

The Runnin’ Rebels (you can’t leave off the ‘runnin”) demolished Duke in the largest margin of victory in NCAA Championship Game history, 103-73. Prompting the memorable “chair lean” from Tark.

What everyone doesn’t remember – This team played rough, but they also scored in bunches . The Runnin’ Rebels eclipsed 100 points in 15 games and scored 90-plus in another eight. And after dropping a 107-105 decision to LSU on Jan. 27, UNLV finished the season winning 22 of their final 23 games, with a 78-70 loss to UC-Santa Barbara on Feb. 25 the only blemish. They dominated opponents, winning by an average of 15 points per game.

Why are they underrated? – They’re a victim of their own doing. Despite the run UNLV had, everyone remembers the 1990-91 UNLV team that ran over everyone on their way to an undefeated regular season and a loss to the same Duke team in the national semifinals a year later. That dominant run — followed by an epic collapse  — made that squad more memorable than the team that won it all.

1994-95 UCLA

Record - 31-1

Coach – Jim Herrick

What everyone remembers – The return to prominence for one of the more storied college basketball programs in history and brought the program its first NCAA title since the legendary coach John Wooden got his last in 1975.

Oh, and those two words that weren’t in Mizzou’s vocabulary: STOP BALL.

What everyone doesn’t remember – Despite the record, the Bruins had a rough start to conference play….they lost their Pac-10 opener to Oregon 82-72. They were arguably one of the dullest (I mean that with love) champions of the 90s, but one of the best single-game performances came at the hands of Ed O’Bannon with 30 points and 17 rebounds in the national title game, an 89-78 win over Arkansas.

And their schedule wasn’t easy, with seven regular season games against Top 25 teams and five of their six games in the NCAA Tournament as well — which is impressive in the 64-team field.

Why are they underrated? –  Most teams that won it all in the 90s had some sort of future-pro star power. This one simply didn’t. Herrick took a cast of talented players, none of which would have much of a career in the NBA, to the title. Tyus Edney’s staggered four seasons in the league were the most of any Bruin from this team.

1973-74 North Carolina State

Record – 30-1

Coach – Norm Sloan

What everyone remembers – The Wolfpack will always be known as the team that interrupted The Dynasty of the John Wooden-coached UCLA teams of the late ’60s and early ’70s. They upset the Bruins 80-77 in their national semifinal contest and took out Marquette in the national title game. David Thompson was the NCAA Tournament’s Most Outstanding Player along with earning his first of two national player of the year awards.

What everyone doesn’t remember- Before their Final Four win over UCLA, for the most part, N.C. State stayed at no. 2 in the nation behind UCLA. The Bruins made sure that they stayed there with an 84-66 beat down of the Wolfpack early in the season.

In fact, N.C. State was thisclose to not even making the NCAA Tournament, needing overtime to beat no.3 Maryland 103-100 in the finals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. The NCAA tournament only took 25 teams that season, and only began to include at-large teams in 1975.

Why are they underrated? – They get lost, like most teams of the 1960s and early 1970s, in the shuffle of the UCLA juggernaut. Thompson was far-and-away the star, but N.C. State also had 7-4 center Tom Burleson’s 18 points and 11.7 boards per game and 5-7 point guard Monte Towe was one of the best floor generals in the game at a time when assists weren’t seen in the same light as they are now.

1997-98 Kentucky

Record - 35-4

Coach – Tubby Smith

What everyone remembers – Ask anybody who knows that team, they first thing you’ll normally hear out of their mouths is “it was Rick Pitino’s team.” Pitino left after reaching his second straight NCAA Final in 1997, taking the Boston Celtics head job, and as a result, Smith inherited a gold mine. Aside from that, the team was the third straight Wildcat squad to make it to the Final Four, cementing itself as the team of the 1990s (Getting thrashed by UNLV gives UK the edge here, Duke fans….)

….And so does this:

What everyone doesn’t remember – Despite the “Tubby just had to roll the balls out in practice” schtick, this was a team full of players that just knew their role. The Wildcats took an early-season loss to the team that beat them in the 1997 NCAA Final, Arizona. The roster also featured four first round picks in Jamaal Magloire, Nazr Muhammed, Scott Padgett and Michael Bradley (though Bradley would transfer to Villanova after  the 1998-99 season.

The team was as balanced as any in its era, with Jeff Sheppard the team’s leading scorer at 13.7 points per game. In fact, only 4.9 points separated Sheppard and the team’s sixth-leading scorer, Heshimu Evans (8.8 ppg). Four players also averaged at least four rebound per game — the most was Mohammed’s 7.2.

Why are they underrated? - They were at the tail end of a dynasty that the original architect didn’t finish. Everyone remembers the 1996 team as one of the most dominant teams of the era, and that hurts when remembering the best teams of the 90s. But when looking at the numbers, the ’97-’98 team holds their own. The Wildcats won all three of their Southeastern Conference tournament games by double-digits, including a 99-74 drubbing of no. 16 Arkansas in the semifinals and an 86-56 pasting of no. 15 South Carolina in the finals. Impressive considering their strength of schedule was 9th in the nation.

1976-77 Marquette

Record – 25-7

What everyone remembers – Al McGuire in his awesome suits were retiring at the end of the Warriors’ (as they were known until 1994) season. Butch Lee hitting spinning lay-up after spinning lay-up. Lee, the Most Outstanding Player of that tournament, headlined that team, which played in one of the more amazing endings to a Final Four game in history against UNC-Charlotte (more on that below).

What everyone doesn’t remember – ….And it’s incredible really. Jerome Whitehead pulls in the three quarter-court pass from Lee with three seconds to go just inside the free throw line, turns, one dribble, and stuffs it home for a 51-49 win over the 49ers and a trip to the title game against North Carolina.

It also wasn’t an easy road for the Warriors, who were in their second Final Four in four years. They played no. 11 Cincinnati in the first round, Kansas State in the second, then no. 9 Wake Forest in the Elite Eight, UNC-Charlotte — no. 17 at the time — in the semifinals, then finished with no. 5 North Carolina in the title game.

Also, a soon-to-be prominent coach named Rick Majerus (R.I.P.) was an assistant on that team.

Why are they underrated? – It’s a team that, like N.C. State, gets lost in the shuffle of the 1970s. They weren’t necessarily spectacular, but they averaged 70 points per game without a three-point line and had two Top 20 NBA Draft picks in Lee and Bo Ellis on the roster. They also didn’t finish all that high in the polls, ranking between no. 6 and no. 15 for most of the year.

It was one of the more impressive stories in college basketball history, with the small, Jesuit school in Milwaukee sending their retiring coach out as the ultimate winner. It’s stuff that sports movies are made out of.

Got a better idea? Did we forget anyone? Hit us on Twitter at @David_Harten or @TBBChronicles or with an email at TBBChronicles@gmail.com.


The best Father/Son package deals in college basketball history

College recruiting is a giant gray area. There are a number of ways to lock up recruits that aren’t wrong and don’t break any rules. Their only crime is being obvious.

One of those ways is a prominent college coach hiring the parent of a prominent prep player to, eventually, earn a signature on a National Letter of Intent.

It (officially) happened on Wednesday with Memphis coach Josh Pastner’s hiring of Keelon Lawson as his third assistant. It’s no surprise the at a successful Memphis-area coach (Lawson was the head man at Hamilton High School and has won a state title for the school) could and would get an assistant job for a program in an area that’s a hoops hotbed.

It just so happens that Lawson has four sons, all of which are staring — or will be staring — major Division I offers in the face. D.J., Detric, Chandler and Jonathan Lawson all have a shot at being near the top of their respective prep classes, D.J. had already committed to Memphis prior to his dad’s hire, and Pastner smartly hired their dad to help get them to campus.

It’s far from a new trend in college basketball. Temple just hired Rick Brunson for their coaching staff. Brunson’s son, Jalen, is one of the top players in the class of 2015.

It’s worked in the past at some places. Other places it didn’t. Here’s a look at some of the best father/son package deals in college basketball.

Danny and Ed Manning – Kansas, 1984

In the spring of 1984, Danny Manning was the hottest name on the high school hardwood. Ed Manning, a 10-year NBA veteran, was his father. Larry Brown, then the coach at Kansas, wanted to sign Manning. So he made the move to hire Ed as an assistant on his staff, which in turn, netted him Danny and four years later, helped the Jayhawks raise a national title.

Danny Manning went on to average 20.1 points, 8.1 rebounds and shot 60.5 percent from the floor before being selected as the first overall pick in the 1988 NBA Draft. Ed Manning followed Brown to the Spurs, joining his staff as a scout.

This may have been arguably the greatest father/son package in the history of college basketball. Anything that leads to a national title has to be up for that discussion.

Although….

Mario and Ronnie Chalmers – Kansas, 2005

I’ve got to give it to the Jayhawks. When the package it, they go all-in. Ronnie Chalmers was a big-time high school coach in Alaska and his son, Mario, was the best player in the Great White North in 2005. Not to mention, he was ranked as the a Top 2 point guard in the nation by most recruiting services.

Kansas coach Bill Self wanted Mario, as did most of the coaches in Division I. But Self was the one who hired Ronnie Chalmers as his director of basketball operations, which all but sealed Mario heading to Lawrence. Three years later, Chalmers helps Kansas to their first national championship since their last famous father/son package was on campus in the Mannings.

Mario Chalmers stacked up three-year averages of 12.2 points, 3.8 assists and shot 41.8 percent from three-point range and was selected in the second round of the 2008 NBA Draft. Ronnie Chalmers resigned from his post at Kansas right after Mario went pro in 2008.

Allan and Wade Houston – Tennessee, 1988

The Houston’s situation was made even more interesting with fact that Wade was an assistant under Louisville coach Denny Crum for 13 seasons. During his son Allan’s senior year at Ballard High School in Louisville, Houston was hired as the head coach at Tennessee.

Allan Houston, who would be named Mr. Basketball in the state of Kentucky and would help the Bruins win the state title in 1988, was rumored to be a strong UofL commitment before his dad got the Vols job. He promptly committed to UT, and flourished in Knoxville from 1989-1993, finishing as the school’s all-time leading scorer, averaging 21.9 points per game. Wade Houston got out of coaching after the 1993-94 season.

Allan would go on to be the 11th pick in the 1993 NBA Draft, while Wade lasted one more season at Tennessee before being fired with a 65-90 career record and just two NIT appearances to his credit.

Dajuan and Milt Wagner – Memphis, 2001

Dajuan Wagner was another possible Louisville target whose father had strong ties to the Cardinals, but then got a coaching job with another school and the son followed. Dajuan was arguably the best scorer in the 2001 class and, like his father Milt, was a standout at Camden High School. Milt went on to star for Louisville as part of the Camden Connection that Crum had forged with recruits in the area and started as a fifth-year senior on the Cardinals’ 1985-86 national championship team.

Those around the fanbase thought Wagner was a lock to follow his old man. But, just like with the Houston episode, Milt Wagner was hired as a coach by another program, John Calipari and Memphis, prior to Dajuan’s graduation from high school.

Wagner signed with Memphis, led them to the NIT title in his lone season with the Tigers, clocked 21.2 points per game and shot 45.3 percent from three before being selected as the 6th overall pick in the 2002 NBA Draft. Milt was most recently a member of Tony Barbee’s staff at Auburn. Barbee was fired after this past season.

Got a better idea? Did we forget anything? Hit us on Twitter at @TBBChronicles or at TBBChronicles@gmail.com.

 

 


The Champions Classic Draft: For when the event is that good

Tonight, The State Farm Champions Classic delivered two quality games to millions around the world from the friendly confines of Chicago. The event featured four of the Top 5 teams in the nation and didn’t disappoint. There’s a solid shot that at least 5-6 players taking part in the event are currently spending their final (or only) season in college during 2013-14, and most are deserved of that.

A bunch of players in this four-team event are already NBA-ready. With that in mind, and using just the players in tonight’s event, how would a draft look using just Kentucky, Duke, Kansas and Michigan State?

Ladies and gentleman, the 2013 TBBC Champions Classic Draft.

Using just one round (because no one is draft walk-ons) we take a look at the talent in this event and how they would fare in a situation where the massive about of talent on the United Center was the only talent you could choose from. I kicked it around, and this is what I came up with.

(NOTE: I included the players’ entire body of work up to now, including Tuesday’s results, as a the measuring stick for where they went in the draft.)

1.) Andrew Wiggins, G/F, Kansas – Duh. The Top 3 pick in the 2014 NBA Draft had a double-double of 22 points and 10 rebounds in the win over Duke. He showed everyone he can play on the biggest stage, now he just has to maintain that.

2.) Julius Randle, F, Kentucky – It was already a race between Wiggins and Randle for next year’s top pick. Randle showed some flaws (free throws?) but it’s obvious the big stage doesn’t scare him. He finished with 27 points and 13 rebounds.

3.) Jabari Parker, F, Duke – The third of the trio of talented freshman to show off on Tuesday night did exactly what every expected too, with 27 points and 9 rebounds, including 4-7 on threes. Well, looks like they’re all gonna be alright.

4.) Adreian Payne, F, Michigan State – The senior is following in a long line of experienced bigs to play under Tom Izzo. He finished with 15 points and just three boards, but he showed a variety of post moves and a face-up game that can hang.

5.) Andrew Harrison, G, Kentucky – He’s starting to get it under John Calipari, you can tell. Harrison is the point guard, the most important position in that Dribble Drive Motion Offense. He finished with 11 points and three assists, along with four turnovers, which has to improve.

6.) Keith Appling, G, Michigan State – I really think he could end up as a dark horse lottery pick in the June draft. The senior had 22 points, 8 rebounds, 8 assists and 4 steals for the Spartans. Easily the best stat line of the night.

7.) James Young, G/F, Kentucky – The 6-6 shooter had an off-night (3-11 from three) but had 19 points in the loss. He’s got a pull-up game that is pro ready. He’s just got to become more consistent.

8.) Gary Harris, G, Michigan State – The sophomore is fully healthy and showed it with 20 points on the night. He was projected as a one-and-done in 2013, but he made the right decision to come back.

9.) Rodney Hood, G/F/, Duke – The Mississippi State transfer has a lot of “best transfer of the season” hype surrounding him. I think he will live up to it. The redshirt sophomore finished with 11 points in an average showing. He’ll need a few weeks to assimilate.

10.) Rasheed Suliamon, G, Duke – The sophomore probably had the quietest 13 points you’ll ever see, but we all know Suliamon is capable of more. He’ll show it later on in the season.

11.) Alex Poythress, F, Kentucky – A guy who was supposed to be gone after one season has improved dramatically in Year 2. The final line is Ben Wallace-esque, 7 points and 12 rebounds (7 of them offensive). The nasty streak has to develop if he wants to be a success in the NBA.

12.) Branden Dawson, F, Michigan State – Dawson has either a double-double or near a double-double in Sparty’s first two games. He had 8 points and 9 rebounds on Tuesday night. A guy who can do both consistently will get a look in the NBA. A long one.

13.) Tarik Black, F/C, Kansas – The Memphis transfer is a brute that has a game built just like Ben Wallace (second BDub reference!). I don’t care that he didn’t score a point. I want him on my team because he’s not afraid of contact, which is key in the League.

14.) Quinn Cook, G, Duke – More and more, Cook looks like the true point guard Mike Kryzewski wants him to be. He finished with 10 points, 3 assists and 2 boards. If he develops, he’s gone after this season. His decision making has to improve, though.

15.) Willie Cauley-Stein, F/C, Kentucky – Calipari’s ultimate project from 2012-13 has proven to be a successful one. The 7-footer had 5 points, 7 boards and two blocks with only 2 fouls in 27 minutes. He might want to stay another year, but if he came out he’d have a shot to get drafted at a decent slot.

16.) Perry Ellis, F, Kansas – Ellis really hasn’t gotten the love he deserves in two seasons in Lawrence. First because of en McLemore, now Wiggins. Well, that can’t happen much longer after games of 24 points and 7 rebounds like he had against Duke.

17.) Brannen Greene, G, Kansas – Greene will eventually make a splash, which is why he’s a bit high on this list. He only had 5 points, but his consistent stroke is undeniable. He’s going to make some team happy as a result whenever he comes out of KU.

18.) Joel Embiid, F/C, Kansas – He’s only been playing basketball for three years, but Embiid is a 7-footer who shows the makings of being a great defensive big man. He had 2 points with 5 rebounds and 3 assists against the Blue Devils, which previews an all-around game.

19.) Dakari Johnson, F/C, Kentucky – He’s such a project pick, but if Daniel Orton could parlay one mediocre season into a first round selection, Johnson, a much more polished freshman, definitely can. The 6-11 Johnson had 2 points and 5 rebounds in 14 minutes.

20.) Wayne Seldon, G, Kansas – This is probably too low, but Seldon doesn’t look like a great pro. He’s great in the Jayhawks’ system, with 15 points, 8 rebounds and 4 assists against Duke, and in this crop, he’d be a Top 20 pick.

21.) Tyler Thornton, G, Duke – I can always get behind a senior glue guy that the younger guys listen to. Thornton, despite the lack of stats, is that guy. Which works great on a bench and in practice. And late in games. No mistakes.

22.) Travis Trice, G, Michigan State – Now that he’s healthy, look for  Trice to make his presence felt more often. Trice is a solid defender who provides depth at multiple positions. He had a bucket in 14 minutes.

23.) Naadir Tharpe, G, Kansas – Tharpe is just a calming presence on the floor. He had 7 points and a bevy of 3’s in the stat box (rebounds, assists, turnovers, fouls.) It’d need to be the right team, but Tharpe could be a serviceable defensive guard.

24.) Denzel Valentine, F, Michigan State – He might be a bit higher if he wasn’t a product of the flow of the game. Valentine finished with 5 points, 5 assists and 2 steals.

25.) Andrew Harrison, G, Kentucky – He probably, like his brother, was a first round pick if the one-and-done rule wasn’t around. But now he has  a year to develop that jumper. He finished with one bucket and he and Young will be battling each other for the NBA scouts to see who could be the best 2-guard out of the duo.

26.) Marcus Lee, F, Kentucky – We’re talking about ONLY this game, remember? Lee has some skill, or Cal wouldn’t have recruited him. He played 1 minute, but he will come around this season and have a Darnell Dodson-type impact (without the whole leaving the team thing.)

27.) Marshall Plumlee, F, Duke – He’s a Plumlee, so he’s got to have that game like his two older brothers, right? After redshirting and dealing with injuries his first two seasons, the youngest Plumlee to head to Duke is healthy and ready to contribute. His game translates to the NBA because like his brothers, he’s not afraid of contact, Kendrick Perkins style.

28.) Conner Frankamp, G, Kansas – NBA general managers love guys who can stretch a defense. Frankamp can do just that. In a few seasons, he’s going to fit that Brady Morningstar role really well.

29.) Jarrod Polson, G, Kentucky – I really think Polson gets overlooked for his acumen. This kid can play when called upon, and I think Calipari picks his spots with this guy. He didn’t play Tuesday night, but he will definitely in SEC play.

30.) Frank Mason, G, Kansas – You can’t ignore a guy who hits 11-12 free throws and caps the night with 15 points after just 3 points in their season opener.

Got praise? Got a problem? A tip? find David via email at Judson.harten@gmail.com or on Twitter at @David_Harten.


Why is Iowa State’s transfer model so successful?

On Wednesday, former junior college standout Jameel McKay announced he would transfer from Marquette after less than half a semester and enroll at Iowa State.

This should surprise no one. Not the transfer after not even playing a game for (presumably) no off-the-court issues, that’s just weird. But the fact that McKay has decided to defect to Ames, where transfers seem to flock like a successful Island of Misfit Toys. Since Fred Hoiberg took over the Cyclones prior to the 2010-11 season, the program has had 13 different JuCo or four-year school transfers.

The Mayor has successfully parlayed a mix of freshman and transfers into two straight NCAA Tournament appearances, but can this continue?

In defense of Hoiberg, he’s not bringing in players with troubled pasts or chemistry issues. He seeks out players that are looking for a home after leaving a program — let’s focus on four-year players for now — and brings them in to his system. That’s not without a few red flag cases. Korie Lucious was kicked off the team at Michigan State, came to Ames and enjoyed a solid senior season. He also brought in a player like Royce White, an elite talent who still battles severe anxiety disorders, which has hindered his ability to fly on team charters. He catered a bit to White (he rarely, if ever, flew to  a game. Driving to the Cyclones NCAA Tournament second round loss to Kentucky in 2012) and got a ton out of him, and White ended up as a first round NBA Draft pick.

Junior college players are seen as plug-and-play guys. Depending on the program and the coach leading it, some schools really use these players, some don’t. Hoiberg is the former, obviously. Since his first season, Hoiberg has had nine JuCo transfers on his roster. Five of them have finished in the top five in scoring for the Cyclones at the end of the season. He gets the most out of the  talent that he brings in offensively. Hoiberg doesn’t view junior college players as simply hole-fillers for a season or two. Which is probably why he gets so many good ones. Two JuCo Top 100 players, Dustin Hogue and K.J. Bluford, committed to the Cyclones prior to this season.

It’s not necessarily a new practice. With the supposed transfer culture going around in college basketball, roster turnover has made it more common to expect a bevy of new players yearly. Before Iowa State, mid-and-low major programs have thrived off bringing in transfers. But not many high major teams, which is what the Cyclones are doing, well.

Got a problem or suggestion with the piece? Got an idea for a better one? Reach David Harten at tbbchronicles@gmail.com or on Twitter at @David_Harten.


Deal with the new hand-check rule, because the game will be better for it

Yes, folks. Even though the new hand-check rules the NCAA put in place seem like a problem, what with exhibitions finishing with 70 free throws off a billion fouls, everyone needs to chill.

As with all new rules: 1.) Referees have a hard time calling them the right way at first and 2.) Teams have a hard time adjusting their style of play to it. However, once teams adjust, it will improve a major problems that arose last season.

The first was, believe or not, all the fouls. Last year, refs were just calling one-on-one fouls with no basis other than the one that has stood for years. That is, you can’t physically impede the process of the ball-handler and going for steals is now an even bigger gamble. This led to maximum drives to the basket and a subsequent spike in free throw attempts. Well, think about this: There’s now a set rule. Meaning it’s now in the books that hand-checking is to be at a minimum.

After teams adjust, the good ones at least, we’ll start to see smarter defense by the teams that know how to play smart defenses. Meaning the Louisville’s, Kansas’ and VCUs of the world. You’ll definitely see more blowouts as a result, but that’s the nature of the game. Adapt or die.

So once teams realize that calling hand-check fouls is no longer subjective according to which referees have their game, they’ll start to figure out how to beat ball-handlers to spots for charges (which is also slightly altered this season) and to cut off lanes. They’ll learn to keep active arms and slide consistently, switch on screens and communicate. They’ll slap the floor, hike the shorts and focus in on staying in front of their man, rather than just trying to get the bump to keep them back.

That, in turn, will improve scoring. With less contact means more space, and the faster, guard-oriented teams will take advantage of the extra area to slash. Physical teams such as West Virginia and South Carolina (the product of physically-dominant coaches in Bob Huggins and Frank Martin) will suffer, but that may also force them to play zone, another adjustment.

Keep in mind this (obviously) won’t be immediate. But when looking at what this rule could mean, come February, this might be the one recent change the NCAA got right.

Got an idea for a piece? Got an opinion? Reach David at tbbchronicles@gmail.com or on Twitter at @David_Harten.


Five transfers with the best storylines of the 2013-14 season

The transfer culture of college basketball is something that will always be up for debate. With every passing year, coaches, players, media and administrators argue over what the future of players leaving and entering new programs should be. Very rarely are two transfer stories exactly the same because players leave for all sorts of reasons. But regardless of the why, a few players have storylines to be aware of and watch as they begin play with new teams this year.

When looking at sleeper transfers, one of the first names to keep in mind is Arizona’s T.J. McConnell. “Sleeper” means that he’s not a big name outside of serious hoops circles. After two seasons where he was far and away the best player at Duquesne, McConnell was looking for a program that was not only playing on the highest level of the college game, but one that was consistently successful. He found the Wildcats, who are looking for an answer at point guard following the graduation of Mark Lyons. The 6’1″ redshirt junior averaged 11.4 points and 5.5 assists in 2011-12 with the Dukes and should get the ball to start the season. A  good year for him should get him a good amount of publicity.

Mike Moser would know about publicity, after a 2011-12 season in which he averaged 14 points and 10.5 rebounds for UNLV. With all the hype entering last season, Moser suffered through injuries and the subsequent sloppy play to the tune of 7.1 points, 6.1 boards and shooting a 36.9 percent clip from the field. He took advantage of the graduate transfer rule and will spend his final season at Oregon, the third major program in  Moser’s career. With Arsalan Kazemi gone, the 6-8 Moser can replace Kazemi with his well-rounded game. Moser has essentially been three different players in his three collegiate seasons (minus his redshirt year). An underutilized swingman at UCLA, then with the Rebels, a one-year wonder as a redshirt sophomore and finally an injury-prone disappointment last season. With one season left in college, which player will Moser end his career as?

That’s the same question you could ask Josh Smith at Georgetown, although he was only one type of player throughout his career at UCLA, an underachiever. He has a chance to erase some of that reputation under coach John Thompson III, if he gets his mind right. In two-and-a-half seasons at UCLA, the 6-10 Smith averaged 9.9 points, 5.5 rebounds and shot 56.5 percent from the floor, although he proved he couldn’t stay on it, which was his biggest problem with the Bruins. He clocked just 19 minutes per game in Westwood, bottoming out at 13.7 minutes per in six games last season before deciding to transfer. Smith made the best decision he could’ve for himself, choosing to play for a program that historically cultivates some of the game’s best big men — Patrick Ewing, Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo and Roy Hibbert, to name a few — under a coach who has both developed and learned how to develop players from his legendary father. Smith is in a great spot for a second chance.

There might not be a player more deserving of a second chance than Maurice Creek. When healthy early in his career at Indiana, Creek was dominate, averaging 16.4 points in the 12 games he played as a freshman before a dislocated kneecap ended his season. He was never quite the same after that, playing in 42 games over the next three years (including redshirting the 2011-12 season with a ruptured Achilles), mainly due to injuries and not being able to get back into the lineup as the program began bringing in more talent while he recovered. The 6-5 Creek gets that second chance with the Colonials, getting back to being healthy and playing alongside a solid corps of talent. It probably won’t make up for an injury-riddled first four years, but a good senior season could help ease the pain, so to speak.

With the departure of Creek, Indiana had a guard spot to fill. What better way to do so than to bring in a graduate transfer of their own, with the added bonus that this one already had family ties to the Hoosiers. Everyone remembers a certain Gordon, Eric, who left an indelible mark on Bloomington in his one season with the program before going on to NBA success. Now, enter his younger brother Evan Gordon, who has had a bit of a nomadic college career, spending two seasons at Liberty averaging 12, then 14.4 points per before heading to Arizona State for one season on the court, where he averaged 10 points in 32.2 minutes per game with the Sun Devils. The rest of his stats at ASU weren’t eye-popping – 2.9 rebounds, 2.2 assists, a solid 1.3 steals per game and a 74.4 percent clip from the free throw line – but he can score, which, with the loss of Victor Oladipo, Tyler Zeller and Christian Watford, three of the team’s top four scorers last season, is valuable.

As are all the transfers on this list.

Got a story idea? Advice? Just want to complain? Reach David at judson.harten@gmail.com or on Twitter at @David_Harten.


The TBBC Fantasy Series: The nation’s most valuable players

So, you’ve done what only a few hoopheads do and entered a college basketball fantasy league….Nah, let’s go in another direction.

Every year, there are certain players that do more than most for their teams. Whether it’s scoring, giving quality minutes, assists, reducing turnovers, etc., these guys do it. So you can count on them doing it for whoever you cheer for.

Below at the most valuable players in the nation. Not necessarily the best overall, but the best in terms of delivering on a consistent basis.

Top 5 most valuable players in the nation

1.) Doug McDermott, F, Creighton – This one was incredibly easy. The guy can not only score, but score in different ways. He averaged 23.3 ppg last season and that came shooting 54.5 percent overall and 49 percent from the three point range. Tack on his 87.5 percent from the free throw line and he’s probably the nation’s easiest pick to pour in 20+ a night.

2.) Russ Smith, G, Louisville – This selection is more about how much Smith is going to have the ball this season than his production. Smith was 11th in KenPom in possession percentage (meaning he got the ball a lot per possession) getting the rock on 32 percent of the Cardinals’ possessions. Now as the total scoring threat — and Gorgui Dieng and Peyton Siva gone — this is his team and it’s his ball.

3.) Travis Bader, F, Oakland – This is a guy that no one talks about if you don’t know a ton about hoops. One of the nation’s top gunners from deep (139-360 from three this season), Bader averaged 22.1 ppg last season, quietly. Je also shot 88.5 percent from the free throw line and got there 202 times last season. Need points fast? It’s all Bader.

4.) Augustine Rubit, F, South Alabama – Rubit played in 30 games last season. He recorded a double-double in 16 of them. In his three seasons in Mobile, he’s clocked a double-double in two of them and missed out on three straight after averaging 9.2 boards as a sophomore. He stuffs the stat sheet.

5.) Marcus Smart, G, Oklahoma State – When a player passes up a sure-fire ticket to a Top 5 selection in the NBA Draft, there’s no way you can avoid getting him on this list. Smart does everything — 15.8 points, 5.8 rebounds, 4.2 assists — and does it in the biggest games, averaging 21.1 points, 6.2 rebounds and 4 assists in seven regular season games against Top 25 opponents last season. He’s only no. 5 because unlike McDermott, Rubit and Bader, he has other NBA talent around him as well (Smith does as well).

Top sleepers

1.) Kyle Vinales, G, Central Connecticut State – Vinales flirted with the idea of transferring to a place with a higher profile. After briefly committing to Toledo, Vinales came back and he’ll be better for it. Vinales was among the top players last season playing 38.2 minutes (almost a WHOLE game, people) while averaging 21.6 points. He carries the Blue Devils, who rely heavily on Vinales, and that shouldn’t change this season.

2.) Jerelle Benimon, F, Towson – Like Rubit, he’s another double-double machine. But he gets the sleeper tag because he’s only done it in one season. And did it big. The former Georgetown bench warmer averaged 17.1 points and 11.2 rebounds for the Tigers last season and with the program poised to be a CAA contender, he’s gonna get the pub he deserves.

3.) Sim Bhullar, C, New Mexico State – YOU CAN’T ARGUE WITH 7-FOOT, 5-INCHES. He shot 62.1 percent from the field and that was as a freshman where he averaged 24.4 minutes and 10.1 points per game. After a whirlwind summer where he enrolled late with Aggies, imagine what he will do with an entire college offseason under his belt?

Freshman to watch (That aren’t the obvious ones)

1.) Jarell Martin, F, LSU – Martin was a top prospect coming out. Then Johnny Jones got the Baton Rouge native to stay home and the national pundits seem to ease up on the hype. But keep an eye on him. He’s got a efficient half-court point guard in Anthony Hickey and a veteran presence in the post in Johnny O’Bryant III to take the heat off him. Because he won’t be the focal point, he could produce a lot.

2.) Sterling Brown, G, SMU – This will be the point guard in a Larry Brown-led offensive scheme. Brown got out on the break with the ball in high school and that’s what Brown will want to do this season. Don’t be surprised of Brown is one of the top assist men in the AAC.

3.) Bobby Portis, F, Arkansas – I got to watch this guy a lot in high school. He’s a 6-10 power forward with a serious work ethic. He has range from 16-18 feet and as long as he gains some weight, can be an all-freshman team player in the SEC.

Locks for production

1.)  Javon McCrea, F, Buffalo – He’s been the best player in the MAC for the past two years (yes, he has) on one of the worst teams. The Bulls went 14-20 last season and now under new coach Bobby Hurley, McCrea has an astute basketball mind to learn from. McCrea’s 18 points, 7.9 rebounds were earned as the focal point of every opponent’s defensive plan. And he averaged a career worst….55.7 percent field goal percentage last season.

2.) Jason Brickman, G, LIU-Brooklyn – Make way for the definition of a point guard. Brickman’s assist average has increased by at least one full dime each season, leading the nation last season with 8.5 assists. Most of that was without Julian Boyd, the Blackbirds best player. Boyd recently re-tore his ACL heading into his 6th year, and now Brickman have to do even less to work with.

3.) Briante Weber, G, VCU – You can’t argue with the nation’s best on-ball defender, going by the stats. The junior has averaged at least two steals per game in both his previous seasons and he’s the best defender on the best defensive team in the nation. You have to acknowledge the defense.

Over-valued Players

1.) Marshall Henderson, G, Ole Miss – This pains me to say, because I love the way Henderson plays. But his 20.1 points per game that led the SEC came on 38.1 percent shooting overall and 35 percent from three. He did this averaging 10.9 threes TAKEN per game. He serves a role. He has serious game. But his numbers are deceiving.

2.) Jahii Carson, G, Arizona State – Carson is a pro, there’s no debating that. But his 18.5 points and 5.1 assists — both solid — came at the other end of averages of 2.5 fouls and 3.5 turnovers per game. He’ll have to clean those up with Evan Gordon no longer in the backcourt this season.

3.) James Michael McAdoo, F, North Carolina – Have to give a hat tip to Kevin Doyle for this one. JMM has time to make up for what has amounted to a sub-par career so far. The junior has averaged 10.1 points and 5.5 rebounds in 30 minutes per in two seasons, which isn’t bad. But McAdoo was a five-star recruit who was supposed to team with P.J. Hairston to be the heir apparent for Harrison Barnes. What he does while Hairston is out (however long that is) will be critical to his legacy in Chapel Hill.


The JuCo Jump: The best junior college players in D-I for 2013-14

Every year there’s a different crop of recruits that make their way to Division I campuses. Not the freshman that are hoping to make an impression. Not the four-year school transfers that are looking for a fresh start. These are the ones that may have ended up at their first stop due to extenuating circumstances. These are the junior college transfers.

With most (if not all) of those players on campus by now, we take a look at the top JuCo transfers and what kind of effect they’ll have on their teams’ season.

JuCo Jump Preseason Player of the Year

Yanick Moreira, C, SMU – The 6-11, 220 pounder averaged 18.2 points and 9.8 rebounds a 2.3 blocks for South Plains (Texas) Community College last season and was MVP of the junior college national tournament when South Plains won the NJCAA national title in 2011-12. Larry Brown likes his versatile bigs and the Angola native can work the pivot and step outside the paint to defend and shoot.

All-JuCo Jump Preseason All-American Team

Chris Jones, G, Louisville – Last season’s national JuCo player of the year made his way to Louisville to take the place of the graduated Peyton Siva at point guard. The 6-0 Jones averaged 21.8 points per game last season and led Northwest Florida State College t back-to-back JuCo national title game appearances in his two years with the Raiders.

Chad Frazier, G, UAB – The 6-4 Frazier took awhile to figure out where he wanted to go to school after two years at Gulf Coast (Fla.) State College, committing to Texas A&M and Oklahoma State before settling on the Blazers. But he was a consensus Top 20 JuCo recruit last season and averaged 16 points, five assists and four rebounds for Gulf Coast last season.

Kenny Cherry, G, Baylor – Gone is Pierre Jackson, another former JuCo transfer, and enter 6-1 State Fair Community College guard Kenny Cherry. The Canadian-born guard averaged 14.6 points, 5.2 rebounds and 3.8 assists last season and shot 41 percent from three-point range. He doesn’t seem to have the small-man explosiveness that Jackson possessed (few do) but he might be the guy to remedy the PG issues the Bears had coming into the season.

Jelan Kendrick, F, UNLV – Here’s a name some still remember, mainly because the 6-6 Atlanta native was at two Division I schools, yet never played a game at either. Kendrick lasted almost a semester at Memphis before being dismissed, then lasted about one year (as a redshirt) at Ole Miss before leaving that program as well. He spent last season at Indian Hill (Iowa) Community College, averaging 12.9 points, 4.4 rebounds and 4.1 assists. He’ll take the spot left by the transferring Mike Moser.

Yanick Moreira, F, SMU – Per his JuCo P.O.Y. status, Moreira just has the ability to make an impact in a big way. He also will be the focal point of a fresh recruiting class for the Mustangs on a team that expects to contend in the AAC this year.

All-JuCo Jump Underrated Team

Desmond Lee, G, North Carolina State – The New Mexico Junior College product can fill it up, averaging 20.3 points per game at 43.3 percent clip last season. He’ll be asked to team with the likes of Anthony “Cat” Barber and T.J. Warren to be the trio that keeps the Wolfpack at pace with North Carolina and Duke in 2013-14. The 6-4 Lee might also step into some of the point guard responsibilities for the departed Rodney Purvis.

Tre’Vaughn White, G, Duquesne – You have to have the leading scorer in junior college on this list somewhere. White had a great career at Independence (Kan.) Community College, clocking 26.1 points per game. He now heads to Pittsburgh to play for the Dukes, and there’s little doubt the 5-10 guard will be the focal point of the offensive scheme. He’ll help alleviate the loss of second-leading scorer Sean Johnson.

James Kelly, F, Miami – Kelly is one of seemingly a brand new roster for the Hurricanes, who are replacing their Top 6 scorers from last season. You could almost call the 6-7, 250-pound Kelly Reggie Johnson-lite, with his size making him a load in the middle. He averaged a double-double of 17.3 points and 10 rebounds at Owens (Ohio) Community College last season.

Darius Carter, F, Wichita State – Whaddayaknow? Wichita State puts a player on this list. The 6-7 Carter is in the same mold as the graduated Carl Hall, who helped the Shockers to the Final Four last season. The Vincennes (Ind.) University product averaged 15.8 points, 8.3 rebounds and shot 54.4 percent from the field last season for the Trailblazers. He’s also Maverick Carter’s cousin. Yea, that Maverick Carter.

Joseph Uchebo, C, Pittsburgh – It’s not everyday that one quality seven-footer get replaced by another (near) seven-footer. Steven Adams left for the NBA Draft after one season and that left a massive hole in the middle. Enter Uchebo, a 6-11, 260 pound product of Chipola (Fla.) Junior College who averaged 12.3 points and 12.3 rebounds in 2011-12. The reason he isn’t getting a ton of publicity is because he spent last season nursing a knee injury that got him a medical redshirt. He’ll have three seasons left to play for the Panthers.

Team with most at stake with JuCo players

Illinois State – And it’s really not even close. The Redbirds and coach Dan Muller don’t have a single player on their roster that was there two seasons ago and in total, they’ve got four players from the  JucoRecruiting.com Top 100 on their 2013-14 roster in Zach Lofton, Daishon Knight, Bobby Hunter and Mike Middlebrooks. With no seniors on this roster, those four juniors will be looked upon for leadership, even though, like a lot of the players on their roster, this is their first year in an Illinois State uniform.


TBBC conference previews: The B1G

Like most other seasons, the Big Ten has a ton going for it. It’s a mixture of playmaking guards and dominant post men that will be the trademark of the league…and that’s just in the state of Michigan. But there’s a ton of talent from Happy Valley to Lincoln.

Preseason All-Conference team

G-Aaron Craft, Sr., Ohio State – 2012-13 stats: 10 ppg, 4.6 apg, 2.1 spg. Duh, right? One of the best on-ball defenders in the nation and not to mention a totally underrated game-managing point guard. Plus he recently got engaged. Being settled down can help a man’s game, I think.

G-Gary Harris, Soph., Michigan State – 2012-13 stats: 12.9 ppg, 2.5 rpg, 41.1% three-point percentage. After starting his collegiate career with a foot injury, Harris assimilated to the college game with little lag time in the middle of last season. Now as a fully-healthy guard in a Tom Izzo system, Harris is expected to take a solid jump in efficiency this year.

G-D.J. Newbill, Jr., Penn State – 2012-13 stats: 16.3 ppg, 5 rpg, 4 apg. Jermaine Marshall transferred to Arizona State, so the Nittany Lions’ show is all Newbill’s. He’s on a team that isn’t expected to pull a ton of upsets this season, but that shouldn’t stop a guard with serious game from getting his numbers.

F-Mitch McGary, Soph., Michigan – 2012-13 stats: 7.5 ppg, 6.3 rpg, 59.8% field goal percentage. This time last year McGary was expected to be a dominant big man. He wasn’t until late in the season. Now we’re right back where we started. This time with some proof that he possesses that takeover ability.

F-Adreian Payne, Sr., Michigan State – 2012-13 stats: 10.5 ppg, 7.6 rpg, 54.6% field goal percentage. He’s the stud of this conference, in my opinion. A prototypical Big Ten big man with the touch around the rim and the ability to navigate in traffic for rebounds and putbacks. He’s going to have a big year, so long that he stays healthy.

Preseason Player of the Year- Adreian Payne – I don’t really see a more polished player in this conference. There might be more athletic players, but none that possess the discipline that Payne has to be as efficient as his is.

Sleeper player- Roy Devyn Marble, Sr., Iowa – Great name, great game. Marble was near the top of the conference in scoring last year and with a better team this year, he should get the publicity he deserves. Expecting a lot from this guy.

Team rankings

Michigan State – Payne anchors the post, Harris will control the ball on the perimeter and as long as he stays healthy, this could be his last season in East Lansing. Travis Trice, who averaged just 4.8 ppg last season, could become an x-factor this season. Tom Izzo knows how to put together a solid team year-in and year-out.

Michigan – It’s not a surprise here. They lose Tim Hardaway Jr. and Trey Burke to the NBA, but Mitch McGary’s surge in March last season, coupled with Nik Stauskas coming back with Jordan Morgan will still make some sizable noise. Caris LaVert could be an underrated piece this season. Watch out for freshman Zak Irvin to make an impact in his first season in maize and blue.

Ohio State – All of the Buckeyes top scorers return besides DeShaun Thomas, and they also have one more season of ball-hawking goodness from Aaron Craft. Lenzelle Smith, Jr. and his 9.2 ppg last season are expected to improve with Thomas gone, as well LaQuinton Ross, whose numbers aren’t just expected to improve, but skyrocket. OSU will definitely need more from 6-11 Amir Williams, who is the only 6-8-plus player on their roster.

Indiana – The Hoosiers will have to replace a lot of scoring. Specifically their Top 3 bucket-getters from last season in Cody Zeller, Victor Oladipo and Christian Watford. Will Sheehey and Yogi Ferrell are the obvious leaders, but Jeremy Hollowell should make a sizable jump in his sophomore year. The Hoosiers are also sporting an 8-man recruiting class led by studs Troy Williams (when he returns from injury), Stanford Robinson and Luke Fischer.

Iowa – This one is a stretch. Call it a gut feeling. The Hawkeyes return nine of their Top 10 scorers off a team that went to the NIT Final Four last season. All those players averaged at least 10 minutes per game as well. Roy Devyn Marble is going to be a steady presence that gets the national publicity he deserves this season and what’s more? Fran McCaffery finally gets the team he’s been building towards since he arrived in Iowa City.

Wisconsin – Bo Ryan will have to replace some scoring. Leading scorer Ben Brust (11.1 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 79 assists) does return, as does Sam Dekker (9.6 ppg, 36.1 three-point percentage)and Traevon Jackson (6.9 ppg) coming back as well. Frank Kaminsky (6.4 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 28 mpg) will be asked to do more in the post.

The rest

Purdue – The Boilermakers Top 3 scorers return in Terone (13.5 ppg) and Ronnie Johnson (10.3 ppg, 139 assists) with A.J. Hammons (10.6 ppg. 6 rpg). It’s going to be interesting to see who steps into the hole left by D.J. Byrd.

Minnesota – Losing Rodney Williams and Trevor Mbakwe will hurt and as of now, new coach Richard Pitino has only one freshman on his roster. He does have both Hollins’ boys (Andre 14.6 ppg, Austin 10.7 ppg) back along with big man Elliot Eliason (13.7 mpg), but a number of low-end role players will have to grow up.

Illinois – There are few teams that will rely more on transfers this season than the Fighting Illini. Drake transfer Rayvonte Rice is eligible, as is Illinois State graduate defector Jon Ekey. Tyler Griffey’s 7.2 ppg and 3.5 rpg will be much needed since he’s the top returning scorer who played at in Champaign last season.

Penn State – Losing Jermaine Marshall to Arizona State was a huge blow. Allen Roberts, a graduate transfer from Miami (Ohio) comes in to fill the spot, and leading scorer D.J. Newbill (16.3 ppg) makes it back as well. The biggest boost will come from Tim Frazier and his 16.3 ppg, though it came in four games last season before he went out for the season with a torn ACL.

Northwestern – Chris Collins will have a decent team on paper in his first season in Evanston, but no one should look at it as a litmus test for his tenure. Drew Crawford was lucky enough to get his medical redshirt and his 13.5 ppg will be needed. Dave Sobolewski (9.8 ppg, 127 assists) returns and three redshirt freshman enter the mix.

Nebraska – Ray Gallegos (12.5 ppg, 46 steals) returns, but not a ton more. Watch out for David Rivers (5.6 ppg, 3.5 rpg) to break out as a junior, as well as Shavon Shields (8.6 ppg, 5.1 rpg).

Most likely too….

…Average 20 points and 10 rebounds – Adreian Payne – He averaged 10 and 7 per game, but with Harris and Appling coming around, solid shooting on the perimeter and the fact that post play is a bit down in the B1G this season, he could beast his share of teams.

…Be a first round pick in the 2014 NBA Draft – Glenn Robinson III, Jr., Michigan – This is a given. There are a number of candidates here. McGary, Harris, Payne, etc. But he passed up first round money to come back. Another solid season locks him into the Top 10, probably.

…End up first-team all-conference after being left off the preseason team – Andre Hollins, Jr., Minnesota – He might be the most complete player in the league that no one seems to care about. Averaged 14.6 points, 3.7 rebounds, 3.6 assists per game. With the right season under Pitino, Hollins could not only get onto the first team, but in the first round of the draft.

Preseason, postseason predictions

Regular Season conference champions – Ohio State – Smith, Jr., Craft, Ross. That upperclassmen trio alone can do a lot for any team. People remember that Deshaun Thomas left, but they forget that not much else did.

Conference tournament champions – Michigan State – With the best big man in the conference in the post and the leadership of Tom Izzo, there just isn’t a time that anyone should ever doubt the Spartans, especially not in March.


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