Five transfers with the best storylines of the 2013-14 season

The transfer culture of college basketball is something that will always be up for debate. With every passing year, coaches, players, media and administrators argue over what the future of players leaving and entering new programs should be. Very rarely are two transfer stories exactly the same because players leave for all sorts of reasons. But regardless of the why, a few players have storylines to be aware of and watch as they begin play with new teams this year.

When looking at sleeper transfers, one of the first names to keep in mind is Arizona’s T.J. McConnell. “Sleeper” means that he’s not a big name outside of serious hoops circles. After two seasons where he was far and away the best player at Duquesne, McConnell was looking for a program that was not only playing on the highest level of the college game, but one that was consistently successful. He found the Wildcats, who are looking for an answer at point guard following the graduation of Mark Lyons. The 6’1″ redshirt junior averaged 11.4 points and 5.5 assists in 2011-12 with the Dukes and should get the ball to start the season. A  good year for him should get him a good amount of publicity.

Mike Moser would know about publicity, after a 2011-12 season in which he averaged 14 points and 10.5 rebounds for UNLV. With all the hype entering last season, Moser suffered through injuries and the subsequent sloppy play to the tune of 7.1 points, 6.1 boards and shooting a 36.9 percent clip from the field. He took advantage of the graduate transfer rule and will spend his final season at Oregon, the third major program in  Moser’s career. With Arsalan Kazemi gone, the 6-8 Moser can replace Kazemi with his well-rounded game. Moser has essentially been three different players in his three collegiate seasons (minus his redshirt year). An underutilized swingman at UCLA, then with the Rebels, a one-year wonder as a redshirt sophomore and finally an injury-prone disappointment last season. With one season left in college, which player will Moser end his career as?

That’s the same question you could ask Josh Smith at Georgetown, although he was only one type of player throughout his career at UCLA, an underachiever. He has a chance to erase some of that reputation under coach John Thompson III, if he gets his mind right. In two-and-a-half seasons at UCLA, the 6-10 Smith averaged 9.9 points, 5.5 rebounds and shot 56.5 percent from the floor, although he proved he couldn’t stay on it, which was his biggest problem with the Bruins. He clocked just 19 minutes per game in Westwood, bottoming out at 13.7 minutes per in six games last season before deciding to transfer. Smith made the best decision he could’ve for himself, choosing to play for a program that historically cultivates some of the game’s best big men — Patrick Ewing, Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo and Roy Hibbert, to name a few — under a coach who has both developed and learned how to develop players from his legendary father. Smith is in a great spot for a second chance.

There might not be a player more deserving of a second chance than Maurice Creek. When healthy early in his career at Indiana, Creek was dominate, averaging 16.4 points in the 12 games he played as a freshman before a dislocated kneecap ended his season. He was never quite the same after that, playing in 42 games over the next three years (including redshirting the 2011-12 season with a ruptured Achilles), mainly due to injuries and not being able to get back into the lineup as the program began bringing in more talent while he recovered. The 6-5 Creek gets that second chance with the Colonials, getting back to being healthy and playing alongside a solid corps of talent. It probably won’t make up for an injury-riddled first four years, but a good senior season could help ease the pain, so to speak.

With the departure of Creek, Indiana had a guard spot to fill. What better way to do so than to bring in a graduate transfer of their own, with the added bonus that this one already had family ties to the Hoosiers. Everyone remembers a certain Gordon, Eric, who left an indelible mark on Bloomington in his one season with the program before going on to NBA success. Now, enter his younger brother Evan Gordon, who has had a bit of a nomadic college career, spending two seasons at Liberty averaging 12, then 14.4 points per before heading to Arizona State for one season on the court, where he averaged 10 points in 32.2 minutes per game with the Sun Devils. The rest of his stats at ASU weren’t eye-popping – 2.9 rebounds, 2.2 assists, a solid 1.3 steals per game and a 74.4 percent clip from the free throw line – but he can score, which, with the loss of Victor Oladipo, Tyler Zeller and Christian Watford, three of the team’s top four scorers last season, is valuable.

As are all the transfers on this list.

Got a story idea? Advice? Just want to complain? Reach David at judson.harten@gmail.com or on Twitter at @David_Harten.


The JuCo Jump: The best junior college players in D-I for 2013-14

Every year there’s a different crop of recruits that make their way to Division I campuses. Not the freshman that are hoping to make an impression. Not the four-year school transfers that are looking for a fresh start. These are the ones that may have ended up at their first stop due to extenuating circumstances. These are the junior college transfers.

With most (if not all) of those players on campus by now, we take a look at the top JuCo transfers and what kind of effect they’ll have on their teams’ season.

JuCo Jump Preseason Player of the Year

Yanick Moreira, C, SMU – The 6-11, 220 pounder averaged 18.2 points and 9.8 rebounds a 2.3 blocks for South Plains (Texas) Community College last season and was MVP of the junior college national tournament when South Plains won the NJCAA national title in 2011-12. Larry Brown likes his versatile bigs and the Angola native can work the pivot and step outside the paint to defend and shoot.

All-JuCo Jump Preseason All-American Team

Chris Jones, G, Louisville – Last season’s national JuCo player of the year made his way to Louisville to take the place of the graduated Peyton Siva at point guard. The 6-0 Jones averaged 21.8 points per game last season and led Northwest Florida State College t back-to-back JuCo national title game appearances in his two years with the Raiders.

Chad Frazier, G, UAB – The 6-4 Frazier took awhile to figure out where he wanted to go to school after two years at Gulf Coast (Fla.) State College, committing to Texas A&M and Oklahoma State before settling on the Blazers. But he was a consensus Top 20 JuCo recruit last season and averaged 16 points, five assists and four rebounds for Gulf Coast last season.

Kenny Cherry, G, Baylor – Gone is Pierre Jackson, another former JuCo transfer, and enter 6-1 State Fair Community College guard Kenny Cherry. The Canadian-born guard averaged 14.6 points, 5.2 rebounds and 3.8 assists last season and shot 41 percent from three-point range. He doesn’t seem to have the small-man explosiveness that Jackson possessed (few do) but he might be the guy to remedy the PG issues the Bears had coming into the season.

Jelan Kendrick, F, UNLV – Here’s a name some still remember, mainly because the 6-6 Atlanta native was at two Division I schools, yet never played a game at either. Kendrick lasted almost a semester at Memphis before being dismissed, then lasted about one year (as a redshirt) at Ole Miss before leaving that program as well. He spent last season at Indian Hill (Iowa) Community College, averaging 12.9 points, 4.4 rebounds and 4.1 assists. He’ll take the spot left by the transferring Mike Moser.

Yanick Moreira, F, SMU – Per his JuCo P.O.Y. status, Moreira just has the ability to make an impact in a big way. He also will be the focal point of a fresh recruiting class for the Mustangs on a team that expects to contend in the AAC this year.

All-JuCo Jump Underrated Team

Desmond Lee, G, North Carolina State – The New Mexico Junior College product can fill it up, averaging 20.3 points per game at 43.3 percent clip last season. He’ll be asked to team with the likes of Anthony “Cat” Barber and T.J. Warren to be the trio that keeps the Wolfpack at pace with North Carolina and Duke in 2013-14. The 6-4 Lee might also step into some of the point guard responsibilities for the departed Rodney Purvis.

Tre’Vaughn White, G, Duquesne – You have to have the leading scorer in junior college on this list somewhere. White had a great career at Independence (Kan.) Community College, clocking 26.1 points per game. He now heads to Pittsburgh to play for the Dukes, and there’s little doubt the 5-10 guard will be the focal point of the offensive scheme. He’ll help alleviate the loss of second-leading scorer Sean Johnson.

James Kelly, F, Miami – Kelly is one of seemingly a brand new roster for the Hurricanes, who are replacing their Top 6 scorers from last season. You could almost call the 6-7, 250-pound Kelly Reggie Johnson-lite, with his size making him a load in the middle. He averaged a double-double of 17.3 points and 10 rebounds at Owens (Ohio) Community College last season.

Darius Carter, F, Wichita State – Whaddayaknow? Wichita State puts a player on this list. The 6-7 Carter is in the same mold as the graduated Carl Hall, who helped the Shockers to the Final Four last season. The Vincennes (Ind.) University product averaged 15.8 points, 8.3 rebounds and shot 54.4 percent from the field last season for the Trailblazers. He’s also Maverick Carter’s cousin. Yea, that Maverick Carter.

Joseph Uchebo, C, Pittsburgh – It’s not everyday that one quality seven-footer get replaced by another (near) seven-footer. Steven Adams left for the NBA Draft after one season and that left a massive hole in the middle. Enter Uchebo, a 6-11, 260 pound product of Chipola (Fla.) Junior College who averaged 12.3 points and 12.3 rebounds in 2011-12. The reason he isn’t getting a ton of publicity is because he spent last season nursing a knee injury that got him a medical redshirt. He’ll have three seasons left to play for the Panthers.

Team with most at stake with JuCo players

Illinois State – And it’s really not even close. The Redbirds and coach Dan Muller don’t have a single player on their roster that was there two seasons ago and in total, they’ve got four players from the  JucoRecruiting.com Top 100 on their 2013-14 roster in Zach Lofton, Daishon Knight, Bobby Hunter and Mike Middlebrooks. With no seniors on this roster, those four juniors will be looked upon for leadership, even though, like a lot of the players on their roster, this is their first year in an Illinois State uniform.